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The Seller's Perspective - Part Two

Suze Cumming

Suze is passionate about our natural world and anything that propels her into the wilderness and allows her to stretch her limits is game on...

Suze is passionate about our natural world and anything that propels her into the wilderness and allows her to stretch her limits is game on...

Aug 30 4 minutes read

The Seller's Perspective -  Part Two

The Listing Presentation

The Listing presentation is arguably the most important step in the process of selling real estate successfully.  I don’t mean getting more clients and selling more real estate.  I mean in building a relationship with that particular seller that will lead to the most successful outcome for them. 

I’ve written a lot about listing presentations over the past decade and I learned something new from the process of being a seller.   A well-executed listing presentation makes the seller feel significantly more confident in the ability of the REALTOR® to get the property sold and to avoid any potential pitfalls.  As a seller, I am naturally experiencing fears around selling my home. Not only is it a major financial asset but it is also a part of my personal identity.  If things go wrong I stand to lose money, bruise my pride and fail to obtain my dreams.  Ok, maybe that’s a little overkill but the fears of the seller do get a little distorted during the process. 

Selling a home is emotional and as an agent, it is critically important to prioritize the management of these emotions.  Each seller will experience unique feelings and each seller will present these emotions in different ways. In many cases, they will present as stands, defensiveness or difficult attitudes.  In some cases, the seller may be quiet or difficult to communicate with.  Whatever shows up, the REALTOR® who exercises professional empathy and makes the seller feel heard, understood and cared for will have a significantly better chance of getting invited to represent them.  This doesn’t mean being ooey and gooey – it means asking the questions that matter, listening to the answers, accepting the seller's concerns as real and offering up solutions that satisfy them.  This is what builds trust and respect.

Without trust and respect, it doesn’t matter how sleek your presentation material is, how expensive your marketing plan is, what awards you have won or how talented your stager is because the seller won’t really be listening to you at a level that matters. 

The agent who I choose to represent me showed me that she cared about my needs, and had the experience, expertise and focus to do the best possible job.  Her listing presentation was natural, organic and customized to me.  She sat with me in person and together we shared ideas, uncovered worries, considered market information and when she knew she had my trust, she shared with me her thoughts on pricing and strategy.  

I’ve written and spoken extensively about email versus phone versus in person.  There is a time for each of these means of communication but when it matters; when emotions are involved; when you really want to earn the opportunity to represent someone, make the time to meet with them in person if at all possible.  Email is essentially one way -  it’s the sender telling the receiver something and if the receiver doesn’t understand or agree with what you are writing, you are unlikely to get invited to represent them.  

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